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How to Be a Comedian – Open Mic Tip 3: Mic and Stand

In my previous blog, How to Be a Comedian – Open Mic Tip2: The Entrance , I discussed the importance of getting on stage smoothly . In this blog, How to Be a Comedian – Open Mic Tip 3: Mic and Stand, I’ll explain the proper and improper uses of the microphone and stand. How to Be a Comedian – Open Mic Tip 3: Mic and Stand For beginners and mic and stand can be intimidating. When you use the mic and stand properly, they’ll disappear for you and the audience. If done improperly, they can become a hindrance to your performance. Advice and Technique: Get to the venue early, get on stage and take the mic out of the holder and grab the stand below the fastener and move it behind you out of the way. Why grab it below the fastener? Because if you lift on the top section it may come out of the bottom section and it’ll become a problem. Next, bring the stand back to the front of the stage and place the mic back in the stand



How to Be a Comedian – Tip 2: Open Mics – The Entrance

In my previous blog, How to Be a Comedian - Tip 1: Sit and Watch, I suggested when you go to an open mic for the first time, well, sit and watch. In this blog, How to Be a Comedian - Tip 2: Open Mics – The Entrance, I’ll explain the importance of getting on stage smoothly. How to Be a Comedian Tip 2: Open Mics – The Entrance Jerry Seinfeld said, and I paraphrase, “A smooth entrance makes for a smooth show.” Getting from your seat to the stage may sound easy, but with nerves, fear, and your head reeling with the ideas you want to talk about, it can be a real challenge. This simple task, done badly, can ruin your time on stage. On my way to the stage, I’ve knocked over tables and spilled drinks, tripped on the steps getting onto the stage, pulled the top half of the mic stand out, hit myself in the mouth when I pulled the mic out of the stand… And those were the only laughs that I got. Advice: Get to the club or room early. P



How to Be a Comedian Tip 1: Open Mics – Sit and Watch

In this blog series, I’ll offer some advice and techniques to help beginners deal with the challenges of becoming a comedian. In this blog, How to Be a Comedian Tip 1: Open Mics – Sit and Watch, I’ll explain how one way of dealing with the fear of getting up in front of other performers as the first step to becoming a comedian. How to Be a Comedian Tip 1: Open Mics – Sit and Watch They say most people would rather die than speak in front of people. Comedians run the risk of doing both at the same time. There are few things in life more terrifying than learning to be a comedian. The open mics are sometimes brutal with critical comics sitting in the dark in the back of the room. Or even worse, visible and disinterested in what the comedian on stage is doing. But even with all these negatives, doing the open mics is a necessary part of the process for learning how to handle any situation when you’re on stage. But there ar



Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 13: Speak for Objects

In my previous blog, Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 12: Purposely Misunderstand, I explained how misunderstanding can lead to funny comments. In this blog, Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 13: Speak for Objects, I’ll explain how saying what objects could say if they could talk. Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 13: Speak for Objects Have you ever looked at an object and thought, “If it could speak, it would say ‘this.’?” It may not be able to speak, but you can. Richard Pryor was a master at this. His routine about his crack pipe talking to him is one of the most profound routines in stand-up comedy history. Eddie Izzard speaks for object in his shows in very funny ways. These are the kind of jokes that help comedians express their truth by anthropomorphizing objects. Comedy Classes in Your Mind Game: Look for an attribute in an object that you and others recognize as a human expression,



Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 12: Purposely Misunderstand

In my previous blog, Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson11: Sit and Pay Attention, I showed how being quiet and noticing your environment can lead to unseen ideas for material. In this blog, Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson12: Purposely Misunderstand, I’ll demonstrate how easy it is to find jokes through misunderstanding what others are saying. Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 12: Purposely Misunderstand In life we all strive to understand and to be understood. This assumption makes it easy to turn the tables and purposely misunderstand to find jokes. The trick is to convince the other person that you’re really did misunderstand. When the person tries to straighten out the misunderstanding, this will give you more information to misunderstand. Comedy Classes in Your Mind Game: sort for ambiguities and accept the meaning that was not meant, and then continue the conversation as if that wrong meanin



Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 11: Sit and Pay Attention

In my previous blog, Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 10: Jokes are in Details, I demonstrated how digging into the specifics can help create jokes. In this blog, Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 11: Sit and Pay Attention, I’ll discuss the importance of sitting somewhere and paying attention to discover an unseen world for making jokes. Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 10: Sit and Pay Attention You need to become aware of the world around you. Our environments are filled with so many things we learn to filter out. Not until you stop and notice will you wake up to reality. The world is amazingly diverse and filled with infinite possibilities. Comedy Classes in Your Mind Game: Go to your favorite place, and then sit and be quiet. Use all of your senses to look, listen, smell, feel and taste. You’ll notice so many things you’ve taken for granted or ignored for years. These are the things



Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 10: Jokes are in Details

In my previous blog, Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 9: Recurring Themes of Pop Culture,, I discussed how comedians use pop culture as ideas for material. In this blog, Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 10: Jokes are in Details, I’ll demonstrate how comedians dig into the details of their topics to find jokes. Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 10: Jokes are in Details Jokes are not in generalities, they are born from details. You can’t write a joke about “family,” because it’s too broad. You can write jokes about the mishaps of vacations, strategies for getting into the bathroom first, and the lame presents you got. These are all details, which will each contain even more details. Constantine Stanislavski said, “You can never be too specific.” This is also true for joke writing. Do you know the parts of a zipper? How to play this game: select some common thing, and



Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 9: Recurring Themes of Pop Culture

In my previous blog, Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 8: Identify Assumptions, I showed how assumptions are the doorway to writing jokes. In this blog, Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 9: Recurring Themes of Pop Culture, I’ll discuss how Pop Culture feeds comedians a constant stream of topics for writing material. Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 9: Recurring Themes of Pop Culture The media creates or repeats the recurring themes on a daily basis, so they’ll have some drivel to report. These themes can dominate the media, like pit bull attacks, autistic savants playing music, etc? Pop culture is constantly evolving, so must your comic mind to keep up with what’s new. When at a bar or club, do you notice the names of the popular drinks? How to play this game: Exploit these themed stories before they become passé. Identify these recurring trends so you can use them as topics or prem



Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 8: Identify Assumptions

In my previous blog, Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 7: Be Playfully Contrary, I showed how comedians play devil’s advocate to uncover other’s opinions and clarify their own values. In this blog, Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 8: Identify Assumptions, I’ll discuss how assumptions are the doorway to writing jokes. Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 8: Identify Assumptions Assumptions are the interpretations of what we believe things are or mean, but can’t be proven. That’s why they’re called assumptions. All jokes shatter some assumption, which is how they create surprise. For instance, this joke: “I had a mud pack facial and for three day I looked much better. Then the mud fell off.”  You made the assumption the mud was removed as part of the facial, which is why this person look good. This assumption was shattered when it was revealed that this person looked better because the mud wa



Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 7: Be Playfully Contrary

In my previous blog, Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 6: Find the Contradictions, I discussed how everyday contradictions can be used as jokes. In this blog, Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 7: Be Playfully Contrary, I’ll show how comedians play devil’s advocate to uncover other’s opinions and clarify their own. Comedy Classes in Your Mind – Lesson 7: Be Playfully Contrary Comedians do not accept the status quo, they go against the stream. When you take the opposite position against other people’s principles and beliefs you can find comedy material … and sometimes arguments. If you always agree with everyone because you want to be like, you’ll never really know who you are and understand your own values and beliefs. Have you ever argued for the opposite side of your political views? To play this game: Disagree even when you agree. This can quickly get i



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